I'm Abe Wolfgang, an Electrical Engineer, writer, Father, husband, and full-time lover of story. I blog about those stories, how they impact us as humans, and why they are important. Occasionally I write my own as well.

Shoveling Snow

Shoveling Snow

Let me preface this post by admitting that I don't actually personally own a shovel. However, I have done my fair share of shoveling from growing up in the frozen north that is Gaylord Michigan.

The deck in question.

Every winter I would be tasked with shoveling some or all of our back deck, which is not small. Often, there would be so much snow accumulation that the boys in the family would take turns leaping from the side of the deck (maybe throwing in a 360 or flip) and landing in the freshly shoveled powder. It really wasn't dangerous at all because we had about six feet of snow to land in. Even winter break from college would find me helping to clear snow in some fashion.

Fast-forward five to seven years and here I am, volunteering to shovel the rather comical amount of snow that has built itself up on the deck. I didn't properly measure it, since it fell over a period of a few weeks and had packed itself down since. I guess you might call it about three feet of packed snow, which probably translates to four feet of actual snowfall. Either way, plenty of white powdery stuff.

An attempt to illustrate how deep the snow was. The shovel is for scale.

Beyond reminiscing, I decided that there was a lesson to be learned here. I also decided that shoveling can be therapeutic, though perhaps only if done once every year or so. It's exercise, the brisk air is refreshing (OK, maybe 10 degrees is more than brisk), and it got me out of the house.

As I shoveled, I found that I had to take a layer off of the top, often dumping into the space that I had just cleared, before I could move it off of the deck. This could be demoralizing at times, because I felt like I wasn't really getting anywhere. It took three passes at the same section of deck before it was totally clear, and even then it may end up with some top layer thrown onto it later. It may not have looked like progress at the time, but I was really moving forward.

That's life sometimes. It may not look like we are moving forward, or growing, or moving as fast as we would like, when under the surface we really are. Sometimes getting the top layer off is necessary so that you don't throw your back out trying to move ahead too quickly. I eventually finished, and even though it took longer, I was able to stay out with my thoughts longer. Not a bad thing for an introvert.

Another lesson? It has been a few days and probably needs to be shoveled again, but as long as someone keeps on top of it, the job will be much easier to complete.

Looking Forward

Looking Forward

Rejection

Rejection